Technology trends impacting the education industry in India

Access to information ‘anytime, anywhere is becoming the defining mantra for educational digital learning solution providers in India. Traditional classroom teaching model has slowly metamorphosed into digital education learning platform, which is self-driven, ‘eduprenuerial and fastmaking India one of the biggest education markets in the world. Pupils well-versed with the likes of PlayStations and iPads, via digital learning, are making smart classroom environment more inclusive, participatory and transforming the education system into an IT-enabled education system. However, resistance to change along with certain infrastructure challenges is hindering the growth of this market. But with digital ripples via Narendra Modis digital India dream initiative, India’s online education market is poised to grow to a US$ 40 billion market by 2017.

Online learning or Live Virtual Classrooms (LVC) have opened new career avenues for young professionals who are driven to imbibe new skills – at the luxury and comfort of their own pace and time. With the evolution of technologies such as the Cloud, Data Centres & Virtualisation, the digital education ecosystem that we forsee is not a distant reality.There is a growing affinity by Indian youth for new technologies and products such as tablets, notebooks, LMS and IWB, educational institutes, and schools as there is a huge potential for technology to be integrated into education industry. Trickling down to the K12 segment, a number of rural schools and teachers are embracing the ‘self-learning teaching models, serving as a significant communication bridge between students and teachers.

On the corporate front, with a vision to make education more contextualised, relevant, edgy, and agile, there are quite a few companies that have carved their business imperatives on one common theme: to make education expandable, accessible, offline and online, affordable, and relevant for todays quick-witted students. Notable companies such as Intel, Qualcomm, Datawind, Samsung, and Tata are looking to leverage on digital Indias initiatives. Again, a recent case in point: global computer chip-maker Intel is partnering several Indian states in their digitalisation efforts with a focus on close to 10 states.Intels blue print for Digital India is based on the three pillars of digital infrastructure, which includes data centre and Internet of Things (IoT), clients, devices services and importantly capacity building. For creating 5 million digitally literate Indians by December 2015, Intel has created activity charts to make learning more relevant to rural areas and to provide app-based learning, which will serve as a blueprint for other corporates to follow-through on the digital learning initiatives – both at the government and corporate level.

Today, teachers are not just giving lectures; they are facilitating an e-learning culture via embracing new age digital media technologies serving the education industry. The scope of instant interactivity – given that students are ‘mobility-driven and want information fast at the press of the button – is generating demand of tablets and offline pendrives, which serves meticulously as a repository of online course (chapter-wise), for entrepreneurs to come up with their ‘brainchild of learning systems to best serve the effervescent and fast-growing education industry in India.

The digital platforms, by a huge margin, strategically deal with the less innovative pedagogy styles and lack of teachers for specialised subjects – giving students the best e-learning experience and seeding an element of independency in their learning style.

On a more social front, the digital alternatives like Integrated Digital Interactive Classroom (IDIC), Content Management System (CMS) andClasspadcan bring an element of reliability in students – making them more competitive in their respective courses. Against this backdrop, there is a huge potential for educators in India to leverage the missing link between teachers and their students – and bridge the digital divide with Classteacher.

The author is Sameer Buti, director, Classteacher Learning Systems.

EW Videos

National Talent Competition
National Talent Competition
EW Survey Forms
EW Survey Forms
WordPress Lightbox Plugin