Refreshing patriotism

It was refreshing to read the cover story ‘Early lessons in patriotism’ (PW August). It is so easy to take our hard- won freedoms for granted. Especially millennial children born into political, economic and social freedom, have no idea of the painful and long independence movement. It’s important to educate them about the past, the true meaning of patriotism and its relevance today.

With the abrogation of Article 370 and many such issues in the spotlight, discussions relating to freedom and patriotism have become very relevant. Your story made some useful suggestions to educate children about the libertarian ideals on which this great nation was founded. Your Independence Day books reading list for children was also excellent.

Deepanitha Chaudhry
Kolkata

 

No politics please

I write to express my deep anguish and disappointment to see political propaganda being done in your magazine (‘Early lessons in patriotism’, PW August). We read your magazine to understand about parenting and how to raise children. Not to seek your view on Article 370 and political parties.

I am writing this email to register my protest against your attempt to tell me what political views I or my children should have. Hope this is not repeated in future.

Amrender Pal Singhal
on email

I suggest you read Article 19 1 (a) of the Constitution of India — Editor

Sharenting risks

I read with apprehension your News bytes story titled ‘Sharenting puts young children at risk of online fraud’ (PW August). Most parents share personal information and photos of their children on social networking pages assuming that they’ll be viewed by family and friends. But obviously we must understand that nothing posted online is 100 percent private. And as parents, this is not our information to share, it is our children’s.

When we were growing up, our parents didn’t share our photographs and personal details publicly. I strongly believe that parents must respect the privacy of their children.

Moreover with online predators on the prowl, children’s personal information is increasingly being used to commit online frauds and worse, sexual abuse and cyber bullying.

Anitha Divyansh
Chennai

Relevant & excellent suggestions

Thanks for a relevant cover story ‘Early lessons in patriotism’ (PW August). Today’s children are too absorbed with digital devices to fully understand the depth and relevance of India’s freedom struggle. I was born in pre-independence India, and I’m shocked when my grandchildren say, “Ok, we are independent. What’s so great about that?”

We need to make an effort to help the new generation understand India’s unique non-violent freedom struggle led by Mahatma Gandhi through movies, books and real life stories. Your book reading suggestions, biographies of women freedom fighters and list of memorable monuments of India’s freedom struggle were excellent.
Schools should also encourage children to make projects about our many freedom fighters. For instance I still have a scrapbook of photos of freedom fighters which I used to collect when I was in school.

Sharada Tilak
Mumbai

Don’t force-feed children milk

‘Should I force my daughter to drink milk?’ You will not believe the number of times I have been asked this question and as a nutritionist, my answer is always in the negative. Many parents erroneously believe that milk is nutritious and imperative for children’s physical development.

Although, milk provides protein, calcium and vitamin D, these nutrients can be derived from other food sources. Eat chickpeas, meats and eggs for protein, stock up on sesame, broccoli and spinach for calcium, and as for vitamin D, just go out into the sun.

Some children are lactose intolerant, and this could be the reason why they refuse to drink milk. Listen to your child before giving into something because it is tradition.

Polly Samson
Bangalore

Current Issue
EducationWorld October 2019
ParentsWorld October 2019
BKG Global School

WordPress Lightbox Plugin